26 August 2015

Critically evaluate the contested nature of theory for social work practice
SOCIAL WORK
Order Instructions:
Consider one of the following case studies and analyse the interplay of structural, organisational and legislative factors that shape the delivery of social work services; the social work role and tasks. You need to focus on older people) and draw on sociological concepts, social policy and legislation. Please ensure you meet ALLthe following learning outcomes in this assignment.
1. Critically evaluate the contested nature of theory for social work practice
2. Critically evaluate the impact of the socio/political context on welfare policy and social work practice
3. Critically explore of key aspects of the legal system in Britain including statutory duties, powers and guidelines shaping social work practice
4. Demonstrate the skills required to identify appropriate sources of law and critically apply these to social work.
5. Critically analyse the way policy and law promote or hinder service user and carer participation with particular reference to care and control
6. Critically appraise the core tensions and issues associated with the organisation and management of social work services
Case Study 3 – OLDER PEOPLE
Mrs Smith is 79 years old, and has lived in the third floor flat of a 19th century apartment block for the past 40 years. The property is owned by a Housing Association, and is located is an area of high social deprivation, which has inadequate local amenities and limited welfare services. Mrs Smith is very attached to the apartment and locality, but since her husband died five years ago, and her children (Jenny and Peter) moved out of the area, she has become increasingly isolated and lonely. Mrs Smith is physically active, but has been assessed as having a sight impairment, and is waiting for a hip replacement. These impairments are causing problems in her daily life, such as accessing and leaving her flat, shopping etc. She lives on a basic state pension and receives Housing Benefit.
Recently, Jenny has noted that her mother has become depressed and disengaged from social activities and networks. Mrs Smith has noticed that her short term memory is not as good as it was, but has found strategies to cope with this, such as writing things down. Jenny is keen that her mother consider moving into an extra care sheltered housing scheme in another part of the city, but her mother is unwilling at this stage to consider a move. Jenny has discussed this with the local GP, who suggested Jenny request a carer’s assessment for herself, and has referred Mrs Smith to the Older Adults Team.

Note: Please include current social policy, law personalisation agenda, dementia care strategy and National service framework for older adults
Sociology – labelling and inequality ageism, gerontology and functionalist perspectives
Bibliography & learning resources
Alcock P, Erskine A and May M (eds)(1998) The Student’s Companion to Social Policy. Oxford: Blackwell.
Alcock C, Payne S & Sullivan M (2004) Introducing Social Policy. Harlow. Pearson
Athill, D. (2008) Somewhere Near the End, Granta, London
Baldock J, Manning N & Vickerstaff S (2003((eds)(2nd Ed) Social Policy. Oxford. OUP
Bernard, M. and Scharf, T. (Eds) (2007) Critical Perspectives on Ageing Societies, Policy Press, Bristol,
Brayne H. and Carr H (2008) Law for Social Workers 10th Ed. Buckingham: OUP
Clarke J (2004) Changing welfare, Changing States. New directions in social policy.
London: Sage
Cunningham J & Cunningham S (2008) Sociology and Social Work.
Exeter: Learning Matters
Dickens J (2009) Social work and Social Policy. London: Routledge
Ferguson I, Lavalette M & Mooney G (2002) Rethinking Welfare. A Critical Perspective. London: Sage
Ferguson I & Woodward R (2009) Radical Social Work in Practice. Making a Difference. Bristol. Policy
Frost N & Parton N (2009) Understanding Children’s Social Care. Politics, Policy & Practice, London. Sage
Garrett P.M(2003) Remaking Social Work with Chidlren and Families: A critical Discussion on the Modernisation of Social Care. Maidenhead: OU Press
Garrett P.M. (2009) Transforming Children’s Services? Maidenhead:: OU Press
Harris J & White V (2009)(eds) Modernising Social Work. Critical Considerations. Bristol. Policy
Hendrick H (2005)(eds) Child Welfare and Social Policy. An essential reader. Bristol. Policy
Horner N (2009) (3rd Ed) What is Social Work. Context & Perspectives. Exeter.
Learning Matters
Hughes M & Wearing M (2007) Organisations & Management in Social Work. London: Sage
Jordan B (2006) Social policy for the 21st century. Cambridge: Polity
Kemshall H (2002) Risk, social policy & welfare. Buckingham. OUP
Kirton D (2009) Child Social Work Policy and Practice. London. Sage
Lavalette M & Pratt A (ed) (2006)(3rd ed)Social Policy, theories, concepts & issues. London. Sage
Llewellyn A, Agu L & Mercer D (2008) Sociology for Social Workers. Cambridge. Polity
Lymbery M & Butler S (2004)(eds) Social Work Ideals & Practice Realities. London: Palgrave
Marshall, M. and Tibbs, M. A. (2006) Social Work and People with Dementia: Partnerships, Practice and Persistence, Policy Press, Bristol
Means R, Richards S & Smith R (2008)(4th ed) Community Care Policy and Practice.3rd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave
Mcdonald C (2006) Challenging Social Work. The context of practice. Basingstoke: Palgrave
McLaughlin K (2008) Social Work, Politics and Society. Bristol: Policy Press
O’Loughlin M, & O’Loughlin S (2008)(2nd ed) Social Work with Children & Families. Exeter. Learning Matters.
Parton N (ed)(1996) Social Theory, Social Change and Social Work. London: Routledge
Phillips, J., Ray, M. and Marshall, M. (2006) Social Work with Older People, Palgrave / Macmillan, Basingstoke
Pilgrim D & Rogers A(2005) Sociology of Mental Health and Illness.London: McGraw Hill
Rogers A, Pilgrim D (2001) Mental Health Policy in Britain. London: MacMillan
Reynolds J et al (2009)(eds) Mental Health Still Matters. London: Palgrave
Sharkey, P (2007) The essentials of community care: a guide for practitioners 2nd edition, Basingstoke: Macmillan
Taylor G (2007) Ideology and Welfare. London. Palgrave
Warren J (2007) Service User and Carer Participation in Social work. Exeter: Learning Matters
Webb S.A (2006) Social Work in a Risk Society. Houndsmill. Palgrave
Journals
• British Journal of Social Work
• Children and Society
? Critical Social Policy
? European Journal of Social Work
? Journal of Mental Health
? Journal of Social Policy
? Journal of Social Work Practice
? Policy and Politics
? Policy Studies
? Social Policy and Administration
? Social Work and Society
? Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law
Websites
http://www.DCSF.gov.uk (Dept of Children, School & Families)
http://www.community-care.com (Community Care journal)
http://www.doh.gov.uk (Dept. of Health)
http://www.eswin.net/home1
http://www.guardian.co.uk/ (The Guardian)
http://www.jrf.org.uk (Joseph Rowntree)
http://www.scie.org.uk/publications (Social Care Institute for Excellence)
http://www.social-policy.org (social policy virtual library)
http://www.sosig.ac.uk/ (SOSIG Social Science Information Gateway)
http://www.swap.ac.uk (social work/social policy resources)
http://www.vts.rdn.ac.uk (tutorial package)

26 August 2015,
 0

Critically evaluate the contested nature of theory for social work practice SOCIAL WORK Order Instructions: Consider one of the following case studies and analyse […]


26 August 2015

Enviornmental law
enviornmental law
Order Instructions:
COMPATIBILTY BETWEEN INDIAN ENVIORNMENTAL LAWS AND INTERNATIONAL CONVENTIONS
MAIN BODY
2 BACKGROUND CHAPTERS
1) INTERNATIONAL OBLIGATION +INDIAN RATIFICATION
2) INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND ENVIORNMENTAL LAWS
3) INTERNATIONAL PRINCIPLES &OBLIGATIONS IN RELATION TO INDIA AS DEVLOPING WORLD
4) ENFORCEMENT POLICY & PRACTICE
5) INMPACT OF INDIAN PRACTICE OUTSIDE OF INDIA.

26 August 2015,
 0

Enviornmental law enviornmental law Order Instructions: COMPATIBILTY BETWEEN INDIAN ENVIORNMENTAL LAWS AND INTERNATIONAL CONVENTIONSMAIN BODY2 BACKGROUND CHAPTERS1) INTERNATIONAL OBLIGATION +INDIAN RATIFICATION2) INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND […]


26 August 2015

Family conflict
family conflict
Order Instructions:
Much great drama centers upon the family conflict,upon relations between husband and wives anr/or parents and children.Show how such confilcts are represented in plays below. the 3 plays are :oedipus the kingby Sophocles,othelloby shakespeare and fences by August Wilson.

26 August 2015,
 0

Family conflict family conflict Order Instructions: Much great drama centers upon the family conflict,upon relations between husband and wives anr/or parents and children.Show how […]


26 August 2015

Investment Decisions In economics and Finance
Investment Decisions In economics and Finance
Order Instructions:
This assessment is a report for which you must analyse the practical case provided (see Appendix 2) and answer the questions set out in the case-study
Assessment Requirements
Your assignment should be prepared, typewritten, of between 2,500 and 3,000 words, divided into sections (say five or six, but you should judge this) including an introduction, a description of relevant models, a critical examination of the theories, the answering part, conclusion and a full bibliography. Make sure that you follow normal citation conventions in preparing your coursework, by citing the ideas or data of others at the point in your coursework where this is included, and set out the full reference of this citation in your bibliography. Any evidence that students have colluded or copied work between groups, or used the work of another source without reference will be investigated and may result in failure.
Your assignment should follow the requirements set out below.
1. Write your results as a typed report with an appropriate title page and section headings. Put trivia (which you think is necessary to be included in the report) in footnotes for the sake of smooth reading. Avoid using appendix.
2. You must provide an introduction to your report. This should introduce the subject, give background information and refer to relevant concepts.
3. You should give a brief description of the models. You should use graph and mathematical equation to help explain the theories. You can choose in the Microsoft Word menu the button ‘insert’, ‘object’, then ‘Microsoft Equation 3.0’ to help you edit equations, if necessary.
4. You should then contribute a significant part of the report to discuss the relevant theories. Then, you should critically examine theories by finding from academic journal papers the empirical evidences favouring or against the theories.
5. You must display appropriate procedures with explanations showing how you solve questions before answers are given. The solving process, again, should be helped with numbers, formulas or tables.
2
6. Any tables, charts or graphs that you produce must be clearly numbered and labelled. Every table and figure should be fully explained saying what it shows and how this relates to the issues you are examining. They should also be put in the body (not in the appendix) and as closely as possible to the associate explanations.
7. References to sources must be provided in the text of the report and all sources should be fully identified in a bibliography at the end of the report.
8. The recommended word count (excluding tables and figures) is 2500 words for the whole report. You must provide a word count at the end of the report.
9. You should attach the group agreement (see Appendix 1) to your assignment. Any dispute or argument within your group reported to the lecture will be judged, and grade of the individual will be adjusted accordingly.
References
You must provide a list of works that are cited in your coursework at the end, with references presented in the following format:
Brealey, R.A., Stewart S.C. and Allen F. (2008) Principles of corporate finance. 9th editioin. McGraw Hill, New York.
Fama, E. and MacBeth, J. (1973) Risk, Return and Equilibrium: Empirical tests. Journal of Political Economy, 71, 607-36.
Sharpe, W.F. (1964) Capital Asset Prices: a theory of market equilibrium under conditions of risk. Journal of Finance, 19, 425-42.
Appendix 2
Case study: John and Marsha on a Portfolio Selection
The scene:
John and Marsha hold hands in a cozy French restaurant in downtown Manhattan. Marsha is a futures-market trader. John manages a $125 million common-stock portfolio for a large pension fund. They have just ordered tournedos financiere for the main course and flan financiere for dessert. John reads the financial pages of The Wall Street Journal by candlelight.
John: Wow! Potato futures hit their daily limit. Let¡¦s add an order of gratin Dauphinoise. Did you manage to hedge the forward interest rate on that euro loan?
Marsha: John, please fold up that paper. (He does so reluctantly.) John, I love you. Will you marry me?
John: Oh, Marsha, I love you too, but¡Kthere¡¦s something you must know about me ¡V something I¡¦ve never told anyone.
Marsha(concerned): John, what is it?
John: I think I am a closet indexer.
Marsha: What? Why?
John: My portfolio returns always seem to track the S&P 500 market index. Sometimes I do a little better, occasionally a little worse. But the correlation between my returns and the market returns is over 90%.
Marsha: What¡¦s wrong with that? Your client wants a diversified portfolio of large-cap stocks. Of course your portfolio will follow the market.
John: Why doesn¡¦t my client just buy an index fund? Why are they paying me? Am I really adding value by active management? I try, but I guess I¡¦m just an¡Kindexer.
Marsha: Oh, John, I know you¡¦re adding value. You were a star security analyst.
John: It¡¦s not easy to find stocks that are truly over- or undervalued. I have firm opinions about a few, of course.
Marsha: You were explaining why Pioneer Gypsum is a good buy.
John: Right, Pioneer. (Pulls handwritten notes form his coat pocket.) Stock price $87.50. I estimate the expected return as 10% with an annual standard deviation of 30%.
Marsha: Only 10%? You¡¦re forecasting a market return of 12%.
John: Yes, I¡¦m using a market risk premium of 7% and the risk-free interest rate is about 5%. That gives 12%. But Pioneer¡¦s beta is only 0.3. I was going to buy 30,000 shares this morning, but I lost my nerve. I¡¦ve got to stay diversified.
Marsha: Have you tried modern portfolio theory?
John: MPT? Not practical. Looks great in textbooks, where they show efficient frontiers with 5 or 10 stocks. But I choose from hundreds, maybe thousands, of stocks. Where do I get the inputs for 1,000 stocks? That¡¦s a million variances and covariances!
Marsha: Actually only about 500,000, dear. The covariances above the diagonal are the same as the covariances below. But you¡¦re right, most of the estimates would be out-of-date or just rubbish.
John: To say nothing about the expected returns. Rubbish in, rubbish out.
Marsha: But John, you don¡¦t need to solve for 1,000 portfolio weights. You only need a handful. Here¡¦s the trick: Take you benchmark, the S&P 500, as
6
security 1. That¡¦s what you would end up with as an indexer. Then consider a few securities you really know something about. Pioneer could be security 2, for example. And so on. Then you could put your wonderful financial mind to work.
John: I get it: active management means selling off some of the benchmark portfolio and investing the proceeds in specific stocks like Pioneer. But how do I decide whether Pioneer really improves the portfolio? Even if it does, how much should I buy?
Marsha: Just maximise the Sharpe ratio, dear.
John: I¡¦ve got it. The answer is yes!
Marsha: What¡¦s the question?
John: You asked me to marry you. The answer is yes. Where should we go on our honeymoon?
Marsha: How about Australia? I¡¦d love to visit the Melbourne Stock Exchange.
QUESTION
„h Table 1 reproduces John¡¦s notes on Pioneer Gypsum. Calculate the expected return, risk premium, and standard deviation of a portfolio invested partly in the market and partly in Pioneer. (You can calculate the necessary inputs from the betas and standard deviations given in the table.) Does adding Pioneer to the market benchmark improve the Sharpe ratio? How much should John invest in Pioneer and how much in the market? (John neglected to mention the standard deviation of the S&P 500. We will assume 12%. )
Tips:
1. Using the CAPM to decide whether John should buy or sell Pioneer¡¦s.
2. Given the formulae of Beta, calculate the covariance. Given the formulae of covariance, calculate the correlation.
3. Construct the covariance matrix.
4. Calculate the portfolio return, portfolio standard deviation and the Sharpe ratio for different fractions invested in the market and Pioneer. Start the calculation by supposing the market gets 99% and Pioneer 1%.
5. Repeat the procedure 4 by decreasing the weight of market to 98% and hence increasing the weight of Pioneer¡¦s to 2%. Then try 97% and 3%, ¡K etc.
6. Construct a table showing the relationship between the weights of market and Pioneer, the portfolio return and the portfolio risk, and the Sharpe ratio.
7. From the table, you will find that the Sharpe ratio will increase and then decrease as the weight of market decreases. The highest Sharpe ratio will determine for John how to allocate his fund between the market and Pioneer.
(The calculations can be done by using Excel, which greatly reduce the workload)
Table 1. John¡¦s notes on Pioneer Gypsum
Pioneer Gypsum
Expected return
10.0%
Standard deviation
30%
Beta
0.3
Stock price
$87.50

26 August 2015,
 0

Investment Decisions In economics and Finance Investment Decisions In economics and Finance Order Instructions: This assessment is a report for which you must analyse […]


26 August 2015

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Weekly Reading Journal assignment
Read current financial news in any of the following:
– New York Times business section
– The Economist
– Financial Times (London)
– The Wall Street Journal
Submit typed or printed notes (headline plus 4-5 sentences) about one article and its accompanying visual (if there is no visual, create your own). Consider such topics as
– Why is this newsworthy? How might readers use this information?
– What management decisions are involved?
– How might this affect stock prices?
– What risks and rewards are involved?
– How does the visual IMPROVE UNDERSTANDING of the content?
26 August 2015,
 0

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Weekly Reading Journal assignmentRead current financial news in any of the following:– New York Times business section– The […]


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