Compare the values in The Iliad with the values that people hold todayThe Iliad focuses on the behavior of warriors in time of crisis and examines what each person owes to him- or herself and to the community.

Compare the values in The Iliad with the values that people hold today. To what extent are dignity, pride, honor, glory, fame, and revenge still important? How do people achieve them today?

*Use the 2 post to incorporate in essay as references along with any other references you use

Post 1
There are many tragic events that occur on Aeneas’ and the Trojans’ excursion to Rome. The most tragic, however, would be what Aeneas has to give up in order to found the great city – love. Although Aeneas’ “destiny is to found a great country,” (Virgil 276) he yearns for Dido, but is unable to follow through with his heart, as he obeys Jupiter’s commands. Aeneas acknowledges this fact as he states, “I may not satisfy my personal wishes as other people do” (Virgil 276).

In the grand scheme of things, his achievement of founding Rome can be seen as worth the sacrifice, concerning the proverbial seed that is planted by his founding and establishing the city. Conversely, there are moments when one may doubt that. While in the Underworld, Aeneas encounters Dido’s shade exclaiming, “Poor Dido! I swear to you by all that is sacred that I did not want to leave you!” (Virgil 280).

I believe that Virgil did want the reader to find it worth the sacrifice. Aeneas’ story illustrated the points that founding Rome is greater than any single person (Dido, Turnus, Pallas and even Aeneas himself) and that the sacrifice was necessary. It also illustrated that the sacrifice was worth it as Aeneas falls in love with Lavinia, indicating that sacrifices pay off in a number of ways.

As much as Aeneas lost throughout his heroic journey, I would not find it worth the sacrifice. Sure, in the end he succeeded as the gods wanted him to; however, the causalities along the way wouldn’t be worth it to me. To lose a number of family, friends and other loved ones consistently in the name of a city is absurd. It is difficult to argue with the gods when you feel as helpless as Aeneas did. “…for Fate had closed his ears to tearful pleas,” (Virgil 276) leaves the hero without choice and to accept his destiny.

Works Cited

Virgil.“The Aeneid.” World Mythology: An Anthology of the Great Myths and Epics. Ed. Donna Rosenberg. Lincolnwood, IL: NTC Pub. Group, 1999. 276, 280. Print.

Post 2

What does Aeneas give up in order to find Rome?

Aeneas gives up love, his true love, Dido. Aeneas led the Trojans to Italy after the Greeks destroyed their city. He began his journey as a Trojan with intentions to re-found Troy. This desire was what he thought would help him found Rome. Since all his Trojan cities failed, he stopped trying and gave up his Trojan identity but did not give up his intent to found Rome.

Is his achievement worth the sacrifice to him?

Aeneas himself believes that his sacrifice was worth it. In spite of his emotional impulses, he knows his destiny conflicts with his fate. He accepts his destined path despite his unhappiness and this is what makes him worthy of the honor that the favored Gods hold upon him. His achievement of founding Rome was worth the sacrifice.

Do you think Virgil wanted the reader to find it worth the sacrifice?

I do believe that Virgil wanted his readers to find it worth the sacrifice. By writing this story, he was persuasive by pointing out that Rome was greater than any one city alone and that his sacrifice was necessary. As the story goes on, Aeneas falls in love which makes his sacrifice worth it to him.

Would you find it worth the sacrifice? Explain?

I agree with his sacrifice. As you read about Aeneas’ relationship with Anchises, it shows you the importance placed on family. Aenaes is also distracted by the temptation of love, as most of us are in this day and age, and he only regains his focus when he realizes that he is depriving his future generations of the great opportunities they will have in Rome. This shows the utmost respect for providing not only for himself but for his descendants.

References:

Virgil. “The Aeneid.” An Anthology of the Great Myths and Epics. Ed. Rosenberg, Donna. Lincolnwood: NTC Pub. Group, 1999. 264, 275. Print